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Getting home

Getting home is a huge step on the road to recovery. While it is often an enormous relief to be back home, some may find the first few weeks a bit of an emotional rollercoaster in terms of readjusting to everyday life. In this section, we've provided some general information and advice on the common physical and psychological issues you might face,what you can do to help the recovery process along, and the types of help that might be available to you and your family after you get home.We've also included a few short pieces on other people's experience, which we hope you will find helpful.

 

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Web Link: Carers' Assessment (NHS Choices)

When someone ends up Intensive Care, close family and friends are also affected. They play a very important part in the patients' recovery after they go home.Given the importance of their involvement, the government has ensured that they have certain rights that, by law, must be met. Close family or close friends are often called "carers" by health and social care services, and most have a legal right to an assessment of their own needs. That includes things like...

Web Link: Carers UK; supporting you to take a break

Carers UK; supporting you to take a break This website and videos explain what defines a break and why taking a break is so important when you are a carer.

Web Link: Citizens Advice (Scotland)

This link will take you to the Citizens Advice Bureau. They can provide information and advice on a wide range of money, legal and health issues including: Money & debt Benefits Employment Housing Family problems Health Services Legal rights & responsibilities For advice in Scotland, go to https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/scotland/ For advice in England, go to https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/ For advice in Northern Ireland, go to...

Article: Cognitive impairment: what is it?

What is cognitive impairment? Cognitive impairment is when a person has trouble remembering things, learning new things, concentrating, solving problems or making decisions that affect their everyday life. This might include things like having difficulty planning or carrying out everyday tasks such as following a recipe, doing your shopping, managing money or driving. It can be a common or normal part of getting older. Is it common after Intensive Care? Cognitive...

External Video: Common issues after getting home

In this video, Anne talks about her role as a follow up nurse at Ninewells Hospital in Dundee. She sees patients after they've been discharged from hospital and talks about the common issues patients and families face during this time.

Web Link: Common psychological issues: self-help guides

This link will take you to NHS Tyne and Wear's stock of free self-help leaflets, which you can download or print off. Not all of them may be relevant, but they have leaflets on anxiety, bereavement, depression and low mood, health anxiety, panic attacks, post traumatic stress, sleeeping problems and stress.

Web Link: Community Care Assessment

If you or the person you're looking after has difficulty with personal care (washing and dressing, for example), you could consider getting support from social services by having a community care assessment of your needs.The assessment looks at what type of services are needed. This might include a range of things, from from aids and home adaptations to visits from care workers or residential care.

Web Link: East Lothian Community Physiotherapy Services

This link will take you to the webpage of the East Lothian community physiotherapy services. This physiotherapy service is available to those people living within East Lothian. This pahe will tell you about the type of physiotherapy available and how to access it.

Article: Equipment

Some equipment is considered essential for hospital discharge, which means that it MUST be in place before you go home.Other "non essential" items of equipment or home adaptations might be organised before you leave hospital, but may take some time to arrive. This might include things like shower seats, bath aids or grab rails.

Web Link: Equipment (for private purchase)

This link will take you to the Argos website.They have a section on mobility aids and aids for everyday living e.g. wheelchairs and walking aids, shower seats, grab rails, tables and trolleys, raised toilet seats, etc.